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Luftwaffe

Evaluating The German Army and Luftwaffe's Growth From September of 1939 to June of 1941

on Mon, 10/23/2017 - 19:41

In a previous article I detailed why as early as 1939 one could see that at least in terms of the equpping and manning of Nazi Germany's Wehrmacht (armed forces) that quantitative measures were proving less important in comparison to the qualitative in deciding the size and shape of Germany's military machine.

From Reichswehr to Wehrmacht

on Mon, 10/09/2017 - 20:59

Though it is popular to think of the 1939-1941 "Blitzkrieg" era Wehrmacht as a near unstoppable war machine, reality is far different. Material shortages similar to those afflicting the German army in the years 1944-1945 were all too apparent during the Third Reich's early war march across Europe and the Mediterranean littoral. Ironically, however these shortages had far more to do with German decision making than the commonly held view that Germany didn't have enough economic resources capable of being converted into military strength.

How The Air War in the Mediterranean Theater Undermined Germany's Strategic Effort in 1942

on Tue, 07/11/2017 - 17:51

When it comes to World War II, at times it's hard to get past the numbers. After all, they are huge. In the course of civilization there has never been a more destructive war. However, it's imperative in analyzing the reasons why the war ended as it did that we also take account how much qualitative factors proved the trump card in determining victory or defeat.

Sea Lion vs. Overlord

on Mon, 01/21/2013 - 19:34

By Larry Parker*

One of the favorite topics of alternative history (and one of the scenarios endlessly replayed in war games such as Axis & Allies and 3rd Reich) is what if Germany had attempted Operation Sea Lion. Assuming a Luftwaffe victory over the Royal Air Force in the Battle of Britain was Sea Lion feasible in other respects? Could Hitler have knocked the United Kingdom out of the war in the summer of 1940 or would the attempt have led to his first major defeat?

WWII Vet and Famed Detroit Broadcaster Sonny Eliot Dies at 91

on Fri, 11/16/2012 - 14:40

Sonny Eliot, a long time Metro Detroit weatherman and TV personality famous for his quirky personality died at his Farmington Hills home at the age of 91. An icon in the Metro Detroit region, with a broadcasting and radio career dating back to the late 1940's what many may not know is that Eliot, born Marvin Schlossberg, also spent 18 months as a POW (prisoner of war) during WWII.

Eliot enlisted after Pearl Harbor and because of some pre-war flying lessons quickly found himself in the USAAF (United States Army Air Force). As a B-24 bomber pilot assigned to the 8th Air Force, 577th Squadron,

A Rare Ju-87 Stuka Found in Baltic and is Being Recovered

on Wed, 06/13/2012 - 17:29

The German army is currently raising from the Baltic sea floor a Junkers Ju-87 Sturzkampfflugzueg (or "Stuka") located in roughly 60 feet of water. Found six miles off the coast of the German Baltic island of Rugen, the aircraft is, according to reports, in good condition. 

Perhaps the most famous dive bomber of the Second World War, the Ju-87 "Stuka"served throughout the war as Germany's primary close air support aircraft. The Stuka carried a range of new technologies that enabled its pilots to achieve a high degree of accuracy.

Life in England During May 1942

on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 18:15

The Battle of Britain remains today one of the more heavily focused upon events of the Second World War. In particular, events that occured in English skies from August of 1940 through early 1941 attract the lion's share of attention.

What must be remembered however, is that the horror of facing random death, injury, or loss of possessions facing the average British citizen continued throughout World War II. During the spring of 1942 German night bombing raids managed to terrorize a significant number of people.

Nazi Germany's Workhorse Twin-Engine Aircraft

on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 14:13

World War Two Vehicles has posted some production figures for German aircraft. Though well known, in perusing through them once more one of the items that stands out is, of course, the sheer size of the JU-88 production program - with roughly 15,000-16,000 such aircraft produced by the Third Reich.

Race to Save World's Last Known Do-17

on Fri, 11/04/2011 - 21:45

Lying underwater in the English Channel off the coast of Kent, United Kingdom is the world's last known surviving Do-17 bomber. In a joint attempt the Royal Air Force Museum and Imperial College of London are attempting to salvage the well preserved Do-17 - found in 2010 after sands shifted that had previously hidden the bomber, and have now left it exposed to seawater that can corrode the aircraft very quickly. Shot down during the height of the Battle of Britain this aircraft, as the last of its kind, is of considerable historical importance.

Built by Dornier Flugzeugwerke, the twin engine

The Wehrmacht in Poland

on Thu, 09/01/2011 - 19:22

The German assault on Poland began at 4:45 am on September 1, 1939. The Polish air force, dispersed prior to the invasion, instead of rising en masse to challenge the Luftwaffe, saw its numbers quickly whittled down in a misguided hope to preserve its striking power. The Polish army fought mostly alone, while German planes pounded the Polish capital. Within just two weeks, German artillery and airpower had killed over 60,000 of Warsaw's citizens.