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Thoughtful contributions to the Globe at War are not just welcomed, but encouraged, including via; a community generated articles page, book and other media reviews, and much more. The Globe at War offers ample opportunities to learn about World War I, World War II, The Cold War, and the current wars for control over global resources and opinions.

The Globe at War features article submissions, book reviews and photo galleries that include short descriptions for each photograph posted as well as a regularly updated blog. In addition please enjoy our news feed; updated daily and focusing on international military affairs. Whether you are a student, teacher, academic, current or retired professional from a defense related field, or a military history buff, we look forward to your participation and welcome you to The Globe at War.


"Why Germany Nearly Won: A New History of the Second World War in Europe" is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom. 

You may order the book through Amazon UK, Casemate, Foyles, and Waterstones.

The Big Red One in Czechoslovakia 1945

on Wed, 08/20/2014 - 17:19

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

Of all the U.S. Army units to serve in Czechoslovakia during 1945, none was as combat experienced as the 1st Infantry Division.  From the assault landing at Oran, Algeria on 8 November 1942 to V-E Day in north-west Czechoslovakia on 8 May 1945, the “Big Red One” spent an astonishing 443 days in combat across two continents.

Last Two Flyable Avro Lancaster's Together in UK

on Mon, 08/11/2014 - 20:40

There are 17 intact Avro Lancaster Bombers remaining in the world. Nevertheless, only two are flyable. One is an Avro Lancaster from the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the other is Britain’s and is flown by the Royal Air Force’s (RAF) Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF).

Last week the Canadian Lancaster arrived at RAF Coningby, Lincolnshire, U.K to join its British peer. The two bombers will spend several months touring the UK as part of a busy schedule of 60 airshows.

One of The Biggest Tank Battles You Have Probably Never Heard About

on Fri, 07/25/2014 - 16:35

As we approach the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising I thought it would be appropriate to set the stage for the brave but doomed efforts of the Polish Resistance to free their city from Nazi occupation. Late in July of 1944 and as the Red Army approached Warsaw's outskirts it must have seemed as if the Soviet war machine was unstoppable. Alas, this would prove not to be true.

Even though much of the blame for the failure of the Polish Resistance to overcome their Nazi overlords must be placed at Stalin's feet (with his decision to not raise a finger to help the courageous resistance

The Sequester: Massive Cuts or The Dog That Didn't Bite

on Wed, 07/16/2014 - 15:07

Hardly a week goes by without either the Pentagon itself or some establishment figure bemoaning the fiscal cliff deal and sequester whose cuts to the military budget began in 2013. Media outlets amplify and blindly parrot these dire warnings regarding the U.S. military's ability to keep America safe if the sequester cuts are not rolled back.

But how bad have these cuts really been?

A recent look at the numbers suggests not bad at all.

For instance, according to the Government Printing Office the original 2011 Budget Control Act (popularly known as the fiscal cliff deal) promulgated cuts of

The 70th Anniversary of D-Day

on Fri, 06/06/2014 - 14:10

On June 6, 1944 the Anglo-American led alliance invaded Nazi occupied France. Known today as D-Day it would be the greatest invasion in history. And though the Red Army was by June of 1944 well into the process of bleeding the Wehrmacht white, inflicting approximately 80% of Germany's Second World War military casualties, this should not take away from the considerable achievement that is since remembered today and forever since as D-Day.

It was actually on June 5, 1944 that D-Day could really be said to have begun.

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