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Thoughtful contributions to the Globe at War are not just welcomed, but encouraged, including via; a community generated articles page, book and other media reviews, and much more. The Globe at War offers ample opportunities to learn about World War I, World War II, The Cold War, and the current wars for control over global resources and opinions.

The Globe at War features article submissions, book reviews and photo galleries that include short descriptions for each photograph posted as well as a regularly updated blog. In addition please enjoy our news feed; updated daily and focusing on international military affairs. Whether you are a student, teacher, academic, current or retired professional from a defense related field, or a military history buff, we look forward to your participation and welcome you to The Globe at War.


"Why Germany Nearly Won: A New History of the Second World War in Europe" is now available for purchase in the United Kingdom. 

You may order the book through Amazon UK, Casemate, Foyles, and Waterstones.

Auschwitz on the Seventy Year Anniversary of its Liberation

on Tue, 01/27/2015 - 22:37

Today, Tuesday January 27th, is International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It has been 70 years since the Red Army liberated Auschwitz-Birkenau on January 27, 1945.

Auschwitz is actually more than just one camp. At its peak it included a network of dozens of concentration camps all built and operated during World War II by Hitler's Third Reich in Silesia in occupied Poland. Auschwitz I and nearby Auschwitz II-Birkenau were the two main camps. Auschwitz I was primarily a work camp though tens of thousands died there.

No Christmas Truce for 2/Grenadier Guards

on Sat, 01/10/2015 - 03:06

Yes we know Christmas was two weeks ago. But given all of the 100 year retrospectives on the famous First World War "Christmas Truce" of 1914 we thought our readers should know that in actuality the Christmas period was for many First World War Western Front combatants hardly as peaceful as the mainstream media would lead one to believe.

By Bryan J. Dickerson*

For many British and German soldiers, Christmas 1914 was a time to temporarily halt the incessant killing of the First World War.

The Red Army's January 1942 Offensive

on Sat, 01/03/2015 - 03:06

Early in December 1941 German led Axis forces had driven to the gates of Moscow. However, the Red Army counter-attacked their overextended enemy. Soviet armies drove the Wehrmacht and its Axis allies back across the entirety of the front, and put the nail in Operation Barbarossa's coffin. Nevertheless, by early in January 1942 most of the initial Soviet counterstrokes had fizzled to a halt, and for good reason.

In just over six months of warfare the Soviet Union had lost control over 40 percent of its population, a third of its heavy industry, and staggering military losses reaching nearly 5

Veterans Day and the Vietnam Era Air Crews of the USS Constellation (CV-64)

on Wed, 11/12/2014 - 02:11

Known as "America's Flagship" and one of the fastest ships in the Navy (in spite of her 82,538 ton full load displacement), the USS Constellation (CV-64) was a Kitty Hawk Class Supercarrier whose crews served in some of the most important US military engagements of the Cold War era and the decade that followed. Commissioned on October 27, 1961 and decommissioned on August 6, 2003 the "Connie" (as she was known by her crews) is probably best known for her service during the Vietnam War. The Connie is being towed to the scrapyards as of this post's writing.

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